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Finally, Planting Progress

Mother Nature eased up on the rain in some areas last week, even as new flooding gained ground. USDA’s weekly Crop Progress report showed South Dakota had 3.4 days suitable for fieldwork; Nebraska 2.6; Kansas 2.4 and Iowa 1.3.

That allowed South Dakotans to boost corn planting by 19 percentage points to reach 44% of their planned acreage.

CORN

Percent Planted June 2

Improvement from May 26

Average Planted to Date

Iowa

80%

4%

99%

Kansas

79

9

93

Nebraska

88

7

98

South Dakota

44

19

96

18 States

67

9

96

 

SOYBEANS

Percent Planted June 2

Improvement from May 26

Average Planted to Date

Iowa

41%

9%

89%

Kansas

26

4

53

Nebraska

64

8

87

South Dakota

14

8

82

18 States

39

10

79

Grain sorghum bumped up from 28% to 35%; the average at this point in the planting season is 53%. Kansas has only 8% of its crop in and Nebraska 36% vs. an average of 26% and 70% respectively.

Less than half the normal percentage of sunflowers have been planted (19% compared to 44%). At a point when an average of 61% of its sunflowers are in the ground, South Dakota reports 0% planted. Kansas, at 17 percent, is just two points behind its average.

Spring wheat planting is further along with 93% of the acreage in the six reporting states completed, only 3 points behind average. As with other crops, South Dakota lags -- 86% vs. its average of 99%.

Next moves

Monte Vandeveer, Kansas State University ag economist, lists five options for those who did not get their corn planted by its final plant date, which ranges from May 15 to May 31 in Kansas:

  • Claim Prevent Plant (55% of original production guarantee, or 60% if you bought up PP coverage);
  • Plant to a cover crop during or after the late-planting period;
  • Plant the insured crop during the late-planting period, with a 1%/day reduction in coverage; after the late-planting period, the production guarantee would be 55% of the original APH yield;
  • Plant a different crop, insured if it was also covered originally;
  • Take 35% of the Prevent Plan payment and plant another crop without insurance.

His full article: http://agmanager.info/crop-insurance/risk-management-strategies/prevented-planting-options-2019-kansas-corn-growers

 Winter wheat

Ten percentage points more winter wheat is heading now than last week, though the current 76% is still behind the 84% average. Kansas is only 2 points behind its 97% average, but Nebraska is 30 points behind its 75% average.

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